Welcome to Behaviorbabe
Ethical Advocate for Accurate Application & Dissemination of Behavior Analysis

Welcome to Behaviorbabe

Ethical Advocate for Accurate Application & Dissemination of Behavior Analysis

"Instructional Design is the systematic development of instructional specifications using learning and instructional theory to ensure the quality of instruction. It is the entire process of analysis of learning needs and goals and the development of a delivery system to meet those needs (quoted from this website).


"An instructional designer applies this systematic methodology (rooted in instructional theories and models) to design and develop content, experiences, and other solutions to support the acquisition of new knowledge or skills. Instructional designers ought to begin by conducting a needs assessment to determine the needs of the learning event, including: what the learner should know and be able to do as a result of the training or learning solution, and what the learners already know and can do. Instructional designers are then responsible for creating the course design and developing all instructional materials, including presentation materials, participant guides, handouts, and job aids or other materials. Instructional designers are commonly also responsible for evaluating training, including assessing what was learned and whether the learning solution led to measurable behavior change" (quoted from this website).


Common instructional design models include:

  • ADDIE
  • Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping
  • Dick and Carey Model
  • Kemp Design Model
  • Merrill’s First Principles of Instruction
  • SAM (Successive Approximation Model)
  • Agile or rapid prototyping

In this episode, Dr. Kerri Milyko joins Dr. Kelly to discuss the topics of Precision Teaching and Instructional Design. Dr. Milyko describes learning as a web of skills rather than a sequential, hierarchical list, which presumes learning occurs in a linear fashion. Dr. Milyko encourages behavior analysts in all contexts to consider the importance of component-composite relationships when designing or selecting curriculum for our clients (whether that be children, graduate students, or our employees).